Have you seen this?

Thanks to Tomity. Read the full story in Fixed Velodrome section of this forum.

Amazing.

thats awesome, we should get them printed, what do you say?

I’m all for it and I think that’s the idea from Tomity. He’s put some incredible information up in Velodrome but I thought I throw it up here because there’s a bit more traffic in the pub and I didn’t want it to get lost.

if we get a higher res image
ill get a print quote

Try this?

http://img145.imageshack.us/my.php?image=080910fixedorgaueu3.jpg

I want one small enough to wrap my tube and I wouldn’t mind a larger one if possible.

I see a new tattoo coming on my skin somewhere… Just have to find some space…

how many you want printed?

I’d take half a dozen. We’ll wait and see how much interest we get.

i’d be up for a few, too.

size im thinkin is 50mm x 135mm

appox

i think a little one would be cool

how little

I’m in.

Should be the right size to wrap half way round a seat tube.

To be authentic they need to be:

A single senjafuda measures 1.6Sun (58mm) in width and 4.8 Sun (173mm) in height. This gives the senjafuda a ratio of 1:3. A frame is drawn inside this space which contains the lettering or pictures. In 1887 a measurement for this frame was also established as 48mm wide and 144mm tall.

But I’m cool with some smaller ones cause I want to go down the seat tube too…

Can we get a price to print 50?

i’d hit it.

pack of gum size?

hubba bubba, not extra

Senjafuda (千社札, literally “thousand shrine tags”) are stickers or scraps of paper posted on the gates of shrines and Buddhist temples in Japan. The stickers bear the name of the worshipper, and can be purchased pre-printed with common names at temples and shrines throughout Japan, as well as at stationery stores and video game centres. Senjafuda were originally made from sheets of copper, but have been made of paper since the Edo period.

[edit] Summary
A single senjafuda measures 1.6Sun (58mm) in width and 4.8 Sun (173mm) in height. This gives the senjafuda a ratio of 1:3. A frame is drawn inside this space which contains the lettering or pictures. In 1887 a measurement for this frame was also established as 48mm wide and 144mm tall.

Ordinarily, the designs were used to commemorate a visit to a temple or shrine and printed with simple monochromatic schemes, but eventually aesthetic sense gave way to colorful variations and designs. In the pleasure quarters of Kyoto, colorful designs were employed on senjafuda and used in place of traditional business cards. This variation is called “hana-meishi” which roughly translated to “flower business card.” Today, the “business card” use of senjafuda is the most common.

Senjafuda were primarily printed with Edomoji, or Edo-period lettering styles, and pressed with the same traditional wooden boards used to produce ukiyo-e prints.

Stickers on shrines are often pasted in very obvious, easily seen locations, but a variation on this practice is to purposely obscure the location of the senjafuda in order to protect it from exposure to wind and rain and thus prolong its presence.

waiting for the printer to get back to me

How’d we go?