Spray paint Like a PRO / getting a BLING finish to paint job....

#1

Just thought I’d post this up from ‘ehow.com’. It states the obvious, but thought if it was stickied it would save people a lot of time for probably one of the most posted questions. Also, it’s worth noting the following (In BOLD for highlight)

I, myself, have painted many, many, many frames but just as a hobby @ home. I have no training or skills in this arena so I’m going to keep this nice and simple. I have NO professional experience but have found the secret to finishing the job properly. For all those wondering how to get an awesome finish, here’s the BEST advice I can give other than the obvious; good paints etc… Most forum posts and ehow go on about technique and rubbing back, all of which is important, but in the past Ive done some GREAT work, but it just didn’t seem to have that super smooth, glossy finish like you get from the shop… What’s the trick? SIMPLE, read below :slight_smile:

[b]You MUST use a cutting/rubbing compound after you’ve finished your last coat of paint. Before doing anything you need to let the paint dry for a few days (usually 2 weeks should be good to be sure as if you go to early youre probably gunna have to repaint the whole frame :frowning: ). The rudding compound removes the ‘Overspray’ or top coat of the paint which is only loosely attached to the frame. You will notice when you use the rubbing compound that some paint DOES come off but this is fine. Rub the compound unidirectionally (not circles) and clean the rag or get a new one when there’s to much mess on it (don’t be a tight arse and use an oily rag!).

Once you’ve cut the paint back clean it down (soapy water it perfect and all the compound etc will come off. Dry it pretty thoroughly and then get TURTLE WAX or similar and rub the frame down. IT COMES UP AMAZING. I have struggled with getting things spot on for ages and just couldn’t figure out that final step and thats how simple it is.[/b]

It completely changes the paint scheme and you can get a top tube looking PRO in maybe 3-4 minutes.

Remember you don’t want to rip the shit out of it so just rub the compound in like you’re rubbing you’re hand over the tube to polish it (It DOESN’T need brute force).

Below are the simple steps if you’re starting from scratch but i havent gone into to much detail re sanding, priming etc theres heaps of pages which explain this stuff easily, but the TIP ABOVE is what I believe will help people the most. Most people think that after applying clear coat you’re done, but in a sense the paint job really isn’t finished and sealed until you do what I’ve mentioned above.

It works with shit spray paint, good spray paint, basically whatever you use will reflect the quality of the finish but by using the method above you will improve the finish whatever paint you decide to use. Hope this helps. Feel free to post questions and maybe I can help/ shed some light? Cheers

BTW i usually use Enamel out of the can, AutoBarn sell really good quality enamel (similar to what panel beaters use) is a can its about $25 for a large can and will get a shmick job. Ive also used $2.50 enamel from supercheap and got a fantastic finish although its a little more temprimental :slight_smile:

These are the basic steps from the Ehow with a bit of expansion:

#1
Start by removing the part that needs to be painted. (You can also tape around it, but be careful about overs pray)

#2
Sand the part with the 300 grit sand paper until the surface is a little rough. This is necessary for the primer to bond with the surface. After sanding wipe down the part with micro fiber cloth and clean with an alcohol solution.

#3
Lightly spray the part with etch primer. A few light coats are better than one heavy coat. Make sure to allow proper drying time between coats. Some people reccomend sanding between but i dont really think its that neccesary untill youve done the final coat.

#4
After a few light coats of primer have been applied, wet sand with the 800 grit sandpaper. After wet sanding, wipe again with micro fiber cloth. (try not to touch the frame as skin naturally producses oils etc which will affect the p[aint and stop it from bonding properly. Allow a day or two between primer coats (you can work quicker than this but again its worth waiting and youre finish will be much better. Trying to do it all in 2 days just wont work.

#5
Now it is time to apply the color. When spraying the spray paint make sure to use smooth even passes across what is being painted. Do not start painting on top of the part because the paint will be heavier in that area. When painting you want to press and release the button to the side of the product being painted. Again a few light coats are better than one heavy one and make sure to allow proper drying time between coats (couple of hours if its warm) dont paint in the rain or freezing cold as the paint wont ever set properly).

#6
After you are satisfied with the color, wet sand with 1200 grit sandpaper and then wipe with micro fiber cloth.

#7
Now it is time for the clear coat. Spray the clear coat the same way as the spray paint. Only one or two light coats are needed. Allow the clear coat plenty of time to dry as this is the layer that you will see most. You don’t want any fingerprints on your final surface!

#8
After the clear coat has had more than enough time to dry leave it for a week or more is a good idea to be on the safe side, You now want to wet sand with the 1200 grit (lightly), then 2000 grit sandpaper(lightly) - dont cut through the color back to the primer. This should remove any heavier spots in the clear coat and will polish your painted product up very nicely.

#9
Next you need to remove the scratches left by the 2000 grit. For this you will need to buff the surface with rubbing compound - by hand with a rag unidirectional as described at the top in BOLD.

#10
Now you need to buff the surface with a medium cut polish to give the surface a nice glassy look.

#11
Whether it be exterior or interior parts that have been painted, I always add a couple coats of wax to the surface. This really finishes the paint job and without the rubbing compound and wax its not gunna be as AMAZING as it could. Again use a rag by hand is fine for all this and wash down afterwards youll be AMAZED :slight_smile:

Read more: How to Spray Paint Like a Pro | eHow.com How to Spray Paint Like a Pro | eHow.com

LINK TO EHOW PAGE : How to Spray Paint Like a Pro | eHow.com

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#2

There also needs some distinction between what paints you use, be it acrylic (can or spray gun) or two pack. You also need to ensure that you spray in a relatively warm environment, and if using a spray gun and compressor, wet the floor first to avoid any dust flying up.

Your tips are ok but missing a few steps on prep. If you sand to bare metal then ensure you don’t touch it with your bare hands after, use gloves so that you avoid any oil below the surface. This can show up later as fish eyes.

Always use a grease and wax remover (prepsol) after each sand before spraying. This will ensure the surface is totally oil free. For the best results ensure your environment is around 20 degrees. Too cold and the paint won’t flash fast enough, too hot and it will flash before the paint hits the frame/part. Personally for every coat colour i like to do a coat of clear if not one extra. Better to have a bit more clear to cut through later on.

If using two pack then wear a mask, and get isocyanate free 2pack paint. Isocyanates fk your lungs after a while.

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#3

Yeah cheers for that but as i said, not stating the obvious, the link is there to the Ehow page with more Info on it all. Im just interested in the Finishing mainly and ive never heard of anyone applying a clear coat or 2 between each coat of color?. Ive done around 65 bikes now and agree you need to keep the frame clean etc.

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#4

Prep is not always obvious to those starting out and it’s good to cover all the bases anyway. More spent on prep will save you time on finishing later.

re clear i meant in that if you do 3 coats of colour, do 4 coats of clear. You can do the last with a bit more thinner.

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#5

Thankyou :slight_smile: Much appreciated. if anyone Has any questions or GOOD tips they can pass on Please feel free to post - Keep it short and sweet were poss :-).

MOD EDIT: As above… and anything off topic will be deleted.

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#6

Awesome thread.

So my 2 cents…

It is absolutely 100% crucial that you use a “paint system” - primers, base coats, acrylic lacquer and clearcoat - that is totally compatible. No mixing of enamel and acrylic lacquer. I would recommend going to a place that specifically supplies paint to the automotive industry, like Bodyshop - over somewhere like supercheap auto (which seems to be more a retailer supplying to DIYers) - they can custom tint your cans, advise you on the correct products to use and supply you with everything you need (including sand papers, pads, silicon-impregnated tack cloths, pre-filters for you gun, spare nozzles if your using cans).

Never ever use enamels. They have no durability on bikes, as they are too hard and brittle. Don’t waste your time with cheap paints because they aren’t that much cheaper than the good stuff. Acrylic lacquer, thats what you want. If penny pinching is what you’re up to then get it powdercoated.

Sanding between coats: From my experience you will get a far greater result if you give it a fine sand (I use a superfine flexible sanding pad) between coats, that is provided that you also remove any surface dust afterwards. The aforementioned tack cloths are very effective in doing this. As Horse says, prep is always the biggest part of the job.

Temperature: A really good tip from a friend is to sit spray cans in warm (not hot) water before use. Obviously making sure to wipe them dry before spraying. Doing this makes them flow like a dream, and seems to improve can pressure. Also shake the shit out of the cans.

Lastly, don’t skint on the clear coat.

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#7

My personal tip.

Add all the costs up of all the things you need to before you get started… (it might be more then you think…)
And consider that a pro job only costs around $290…

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#8

Totally agree. I’ve just finished painting my frame and including soda blasting it cost me around that, maybe slightly less but only just. Main problem that I found was that the quantities you have to buy your paint, thinners, prepsol and clear, you could easily do two, or maybe three frames. And there are so many costs that you overlook before you start.

All in all, only worth doing if you enjoy the challenge of it, otherwise I’d leave it to the pros. Glad I did it but won’t be doing it again.

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#9

And that is something a lot of people underestemating.
If you’re looking for a project and a bit of fun,and don’t have high expectation of the endresult then it’s okay.
But don’t forget if you stuff up,you wil have to start all over again and add more costs to the total price…

I am one of thos pro’s, and besides the fact that I can do it quick, i can also personally garantee it wil look good.
And on top of that I can paint it in any colour you like,nut just what is availible in a can… i can even do designs and add more colours…

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#10

Okay, so last words from me. What I didn’t know beforehand but would have made my spray job even better. Note: these tips refer to spraying with an air compressor and spray gun. (I can’t imagine getting a good result spraying clearcoat with a can).

  • Spray the pressure up around 5-6 bar. Some spray with the pressure even higher. You want the paint to atomize.
  • Don’t spray if the temp is over 25 C. Get up early in the morning and spray at like 6am if needed.
  • Mix paint and thinners 50/50 but acrylic clear and thinners 40/60 to 35/65. It will ‘string’ if there’s not enough pressure or thinners in the mix (comes out like fairy-floss).
  • Work super fast across the frame with the clear to maintain a consistant ‘wetness’ across the frame. This will allow the frame to dry consistantly and avoid the clear getting an eggshell appearance in the part you’ve sprayed first.
  • give yourself at least two weeks before you use any cutting compound on the frame.
  • the clear will remain soft for months, so be nice to it and watch your wheel nuts and seat clamp, the paint will squish out from underneath clamped components.

If you can get yourself a few frames together to paint you’ll be able to afford to spray with a 2-pack clear - its not cost effective to buy for just one frame because you have to buy a fair bit of it. The 2-pack, I am told, is easier to work with because it gives you a 5 minute window before the paint starts to set. And it is also harder than acrylic when dry.

But the best tip that I can give is to have the frame soda blasted over sand or bead-blasting. The finish is amazing - equivent to 280 sandpaper I reckon - this will cut your prep time down to nothing.

Painting is some nerve racking business. Consider yourself forewarned!!:smiley:

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#11

hey great thread guys, I’m looking for a quality, gloss acrylic top coat for the spray gun. I’m currently using a rattle can auto one is not too happy with it. Got any recommendations?

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#12

De Beer Paints are top notch. You can get them from Body Shop in Richmond (Melb).

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#13

Masking Question

i need to mask some lug cut outs to paint a different colour, do i take off the mask and re-mask between each coat, or just wait till ive applied the final coat of paint, and then remove the masks?

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#14

one option is to spray the cut outs now, let them dry, then fill with playdough or vaso, or grease or whatever, then spray the rest of the bike, then remove grease, cutouts done.

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#15

thats a good idea, never thought about it like that. Being a light colour cut out, and dark base coat, that could work well.

cheers dude!

finally getting closer…=D

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#16

yep, helped a few dudes paint some tickford brake calipers which had the tickford logo recessed in the casting which they wanted a diff colour :slight_smile:

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#17

Hate to be a buzz kill but I have one slight problem with that idea, and that is that you want to avoid any greasy substances when prepping, and grease on the frame will give ‘fish eyes’, read fuck it up.

I’ve painted heaps of picture frames, furniture, paintings and a couple of bike frames. Edging tape, “bleed coating” with the base colour first, then over with the second colour. This would be my method. Call me old fashioned.

You shouldn’t need to mask twice when spraying a frame as your colour coats should be quite thin and the clear coat will disguise any ridge between the two. If you’re really anal you’ll be buffing back your clear anyway so it’ll be dead flat.

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#18

dice, thanks for chiming in. can you please elaborate? or in super layman/noobie terms.

your saying, i only need to mask once, and shouldnt worry about the paint coming off when i take of the masking tape?

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#19

No, it shouldn’t provided that you don’t leave it on too long. And are using automotive lacquers rather than enamels, and have laid down a good primer coat.

Don’t use cheap masking tape. Ideally, buy some edging tape from a panel paint supplies, its flexible and will bond well, and is removable. You can also get a good quality 3M blue delicate painters tape (orange inside the roll) from Bunnings that will be fine for covering larger areas / or for a fairly decent ghetto job (it has a crisp clean edge and stays on - I swear buy this stuff).

When you peel the tape off be super careful and peel the tape back on itself rather than pulling it out from the frame (hard to explain, hmmm).

btw you know that lug lining on custom bikes is most often done by hand? So you might want to consider touching up the lugs with a fine brush after you’ve finished masking. You’d be amazed at what the clear can disguise too.

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#20

cheers dice, maybe our lines are a little crossed.

wasnt looking at lug lining, but the cutouts withinin the lugs themselves.


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